Be Patient…


We live today in the culture of hurry. We want our food fast, our internet fast, our weight loss programs fast, our test results fast. We tend to seek out the quick fix, the shortcut. We don’t want to invest the time, just get it done, the sooner the better. Microwave beats stove top and temporary repairs are preferred over lasting solutions. We just don’t have the time to invest in doing things properly or the right way because we have to get to the next thing. Can’t we just pay a guy or order it on Amazon and get it done already? And while technological advances have certainly made life easier, we seem to have lost our ability to exercise a little patience. The best things in life always seem to take a little time. Do we even know anymore what it means to be patient?

If you have ever watched a craftsman at work, it becomes apparent rather quickly that there is always an element of time involved. The craftsman isn’t just trying to get the job done, but instead is seeking to get the job done where the result is perfect and beautiful and pleasing. People are willing to pay more for that person because the quality of the work speaks for itself. And as much as our frenetic world says otherwise, quality always makes the lasting impression. It’s quality, not quantity that we are after. The lowest bidder’s work generally reflects a lower quality because of the time and effort they are willing to exert on the task. If you pay less, you generally get less. The cheap clothing doesn’t last and for every dollar you save in your purchase, you pay for in terms of its longevity. It is better that you spend more on the front end than count on the bargain to stand the test of time.

In life, the best things take time. Relationships take time. Raising children takes time. Perfecting a skill takes time. Success takes time. Learning to live life the best way takes time. There are no shortcuts. Shortcuts always promise a faster result but fail to deliver, though they appear to do so at first. Whatever is easy generally isn’t worth it. That’s not to say that everything good is hard, but rather that good things require an investment on your part. Expecting good things without investing your own personal time and energy into those good things cannot fail but to produce loss. You may be able to count on the conveniences of technology to make things happen faster, but the real things in life; the most important things, require time and with time, patience.

Patience is a lost virtue in the helter-skelter of life today. We have been seduced by technology into thinking that there is always a way to obtain a result more quickly. We carry that mindset into our important life activities and expect a similar result. We seek to get the degree quickly in order to advance, but leave off the learning. We pursue important changes in our lives by employing the method that seems to get us there the fastest. We are all hat and no cowboy. We look good not by patient training and self control, but by the cosmetic surgeon’s scalpel. We want the diet plan that offers to burn the calories via a pill that requires neither exercise nor portion control. We want to have our cake and eat it too. In terms of our mental health, we don’t want to invest the time in discovering where our thinking patterns have gone astray, but instead seek for a diagnosis with its subsequent promised medication fix. And while medication is a beautiful addition to life, the goal was always that we arrived at the good place naturally, even if it took a little time. Modern advances certainly succeed in making life easier, but sometimes the ease and the convenience are not what we really need. It’s the pricks and the obstacles and the difficulties of life that really put us on our toes and awaken us to life’s more important lessons, as Emerson masterfully noted. Give a man a serious challenge to contend with and note how quickly he engages himself fully until a solution is at last found.

The reason we do not exhibit patience in life is that we have bought into the illusion that we have no time. We fail to recognize how forcefully we are being pushed and pulled towards activities that have little impact in helping us to live our best lives. We feel as if we don’t have time to think things through, much less the time required to actually solve our problems and make strides towards a brighter future. We are loathe to engage in something uncomfortable or new even if that new thing might serve to completely revolutionize our lives. Instead we go to work expending our best efforts for someone else and leave ourselves and our happiness undone. When we try something new or endeavor to move in a different direction, we feel that we don’t have the time or the energy to make the necessary changes though we only gave it a minimal try at best. Living this way, we soon find ourselves at the end of this brief life, full of regrets regarding the man or woman we always knew we could be. And all along all we had need of was a little patience. All we needed to do was step off the hamster wheel and take ourselves to account. We only needed to slow down a little and give our lives a little more consideration.

It’s never too late to begin practicing patience. Patience isn’t as concerned in getting the job done as it is in getting the job done properly. Patience knows that all good things take time and allots its time accordingly. Patience is required to live a successful life and to allow yourself the love and the space to get it right! Be patient with yourself and extend that same patience to everyone and every thing that you love. Be patient.

 

2 thoughts on “Be Patient…

  1. Hey John and Paul

    Tony came up with another great one, this guy can share some helping hints. Love reading this one, I’ll be more patient in my artery this year, especially after reading this one.

    jim

    On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 9:45 PM justsomegoodthoughtsgigoiogiigigi ups wrote:

    > Papa Tony posted: “We live today in the culture of hurry. We want our food > fast, our internet fast, our weight loss programs fast, our test results > fast. We tend to seek out the quick fix, the shortcut. We don’t want to > invest the time, just get it done, the sooner the bett” >

  2. Tony you are so Right, Dang, thanks for the reminder, man that was timely. Why? Well my friend and I started a new way to Hunt Big Game. And we’ve been doing it for 2 years now with Bow and arrows, instead of a rifle. Wow is it hard, and your article is confronting my confession and thinking. I said the other day, (because of all the challenges that come with Archery Hunting), “Man I wish I could LEARN everything in ONE year”. Well after reading your article, that’s NOT being patient, and yes I need to be patient with myself and my buddy’s growth as well. Being Patient is a Huge Key in Archery, and obvious the learning aspect as well.

    And to commit about being Patient well doing things, doing projects around the house, Yes being Patient within the process will cost you more time, more solution type of thinking, doing it right. Having Integrity will also cost you time and money, using the “right” product for the application at hand. Sometime Integrity will cost my money when working on someone’s home, why is that? Well there might be a little detail I rushed and overlooked and when the integrity kicks in, it’s my problem I didn’t think it all the way through, NOT the home owner’s missed detail. So, I continue on the project doing it right, and doing it right, some times cost more money expected. Anyway thanks for the reminder on that Note as well.

    And Yes, the world has tricked me into “thinking”, I don’t have enough time. Be more Patient leads to being just regular Patience. And if your the guy that is Patient and takes your time doing things, Great—Tell Others what You Do. It just might help them, like this article just did.

    Thanks Tony again.
    Great Article
    Jim

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